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George Fox College 
iotas 



The Crescent I 



VOLUME XXXV 



NBWBERG, OREGON, DECEMBER 19, 1923 



NUMBER 3 



J 



1NTERCLASS GAMES 
SHARPLYCONTESTED 

Tournament Shows Up Good Mater- 
ial for New Team 



Beginning on Monday, December 
3, the annual inter-class basketball 
tournament started off with the first 
and second year academy teams play- 
ing the opening game. Both teams 
were matched fairly well the first 
half, but in the second half the sec- 
ond years outplayed their opponents 
and the score favored the second 
years very decidedly. The second 
game of the evening was played be- 
tween the sophomores and freshmen. 
The sophomores outplayed their op- 
ponents a little the first half but 
failed to launch an effective offen- 
sive until the second half of the 
game. The wearers of the "green" 
were willing but lacked experience. 

Tuesday the third and fourth years 
mixed. It was a scrappy contest, 
}>ut the fourth years piled u,p a 
safe lead, which the thirds could 
not overcome. This game made the 
fourth years champs of the academy. 

The second college game was be- 
tween the juniors and the commer- 
cials. The juniors were badly out 
of practice and while they held down 
their better trained opponents to a 
small score, the commercials had a 
five point lead when the final bell 
clanged. 

Thursday witnessed the best and 
fastest game of the tournament when 
the undefeated commercials and the 
victorious sophomores from the col- 
lege fought for the supremacy. Both 
teams were out to win and judging 
from the poor luck of the sophomores 
in basket shooting during the first 
half, the commercials seemingly had 
a walkaway. In the second half the 
jinx left the sophomores and they 
outplayed the opposing team 28-18. 

Friday ended the tournament with 
the closing game Iplayed between 
the sophomores, champions of the 
college, and the fourth years, champ- 
ions of the academy. The game 
was hard fought and showed ability 
in several players. The sophomores 
proved themselves superior in team 
work and won by a 28-18 score. 

The class games as a whole prov- 
ed successful and promised material 
for the varsity squad. At the present 
writing it is too early to judge the 
ability of individual prospects for the 
college team. Practice has been in 
progress for a week but the men 
turning out are showing a willing- 
ness to get into the harness and 
work. Harlin Rinard and Floyd 
Leinard are out for center; Hubert 
Armstrong, Paul Brown, William 
Sanders and Ralph Hester are work- 
ing for guard positions and H. Rin- 
ard, W. Woodward, G. Mellinger, 
John Chenevert and Hinshaw are 
out for forwards. The present turn- 
out shows Armstrong as the only 
letter man on the squad from last 
year. It means hard work by the 
players and strong backing by the 
student body. 



WIELD TEAM TAKES FIRST 

PACIFIC SECOND GAME 



Deciding Game at Dayton Should Be 
Exciting Contest 



The volley ball girls appreciated 
the good turn out of Pacific folks 
I that accompanied them down to Mc- 
Minnville the other day to witness 
the game. Due to several misfor- 
tunes on the road the game was a 
little late in starting, and it was 
some time before our Pacific team 
got warmed up to their usual play- 
ing. Olive Armstrong sprained her 
ankle in the first game, but after 
a rest of a few minutes went back 
onto the floor and played thruout 
the remaining games. The girls have 
been putting in hours of practice 
since the game and hope to carry 
off the victory when Linfield comes 
j down here. The final score was — 
i first two games to Linfield, next two 
! games to Pacific and the last, a love 
game to Linfield, giving Linfield the 
victory of three to two. 



The Pacific College volley ball 
team proved that "practice makes 
perfect" by carrying off the honors 
in the second game of the volley 
ball series between Linfield and 
Pacific, played on the home floor 
Thursday, Dec. 13, defeating the Lin- 
field girls by a 3-2 score. 

The first game started off with 
P. C. serving, and ended in her 
j favor. The second, like the first, 
I was also in favor of Pacific; and in 
I the third the Quaker girls lost by a 
I narrow margin as the playing on 
I both sides was very skillful. 
I The Linfield girls tasting victory 
spurred themselves on and took the 
fourth game, leaving the two teams 
tied for the final game; which the 
Quaker girls, by consistent playing 
I and hearty support from the side- 
lines took, winning the final game 
of the series. 

Both teams are evenly matched as 
' shown by the close scoring, and both 
1 teams are consistent in team work. 
The third and final series will be 
played at Dayton next Thursday, 
Dec. 20, and should be an exciting 
| game. Pacific students should turn 
I out enmasse and help their girls 
win. 



It has been suggested that Helen 
Nordyke return the intangible ob- 
ject which she declares she stole. 



AT KANYON HALL 

| Thanksgiving vacation was spent 
i pleasantly by everyone If all reports 
| are true. Those who could not go 

home were invited out for dinner at 
I various homes in the city. 

Somebody during Thanksgiving va- 
| cation must have felt the urge of 
. the Hallowe'en spirit. Consequently 
j the girl's dormatory got the benefit 

of it. They traveled under the name 
j of K. K. K. 

I There will be a Xmas tree and 
] a program at the dormitory Saturday 
i evening, the fifteenth, 
i Everyone is looking forward to 

Christmas and the joy of home going 

with a bit of rest thrown in. 

Retha Tucker was a guest of 

Lucille Clough (Sunday, the ninth. 
Merry Xmas and a Happy New 

Year. 



SOPHOMORES FEAST IN 

VICTORIOUS SPIRIT 



Class Shows Good Material For 
Varsity 



It was the evening of December 
5, class tournaments were over, but 
not forgotten. One by one, and two 
by two the sophomores entered room 
14 which was well decorated with 
ferns and fir boughs. Tables were 
arranged in different parts of the 
room for playing games. Rook, smut, 
crokinale, animal and horse shoe 
were some of the sports participat- 
ed in. 

In the middle of the floor stood 
the most interesting table of all — 
the dining table. It was plainly 
decorated with green ferns. In the 
middle stood a basket ball surround- 
ed by P. C. colors. 

The oyster stew, typical of the 
victory over the freshmen, commer- 
cial students and fourth years, was 
enjoyed by all eighteen present. Each 
place card was sent around the table 
and the name of each one written 
on it. 

After a speech by the captain, 
Wendell Woodward, and the referee, 
Prof. Newlin, and the singing of the 
chorus to the college song, the 
"satisfied sophomores" returned to 
their respective homes. 



NEWS FROM OLD FRIENDS 

Do we appreciate Pacific College — 
we folks who are here? These are 
some of the confessions that have 
been received around here recently: 

John Elford, 0. A. C, says "For 
goodness sake make the very most of 
your advantage of a small school 
in promoting interclass friendship, 
etc., * * * after seeing its entire 
absence down here I have altered 
my ideas somewhat. I wish I could 
make everyone there realize the im- 
portance of this as I see it now. * * 
I think I ought to tell them what 
I think about it anyway, and some 
of the older ones who remember me 
will surely think I have been con- 
verted to something new." 

Helen Baird, Willamette, now 
realizes the value of work she pre- 
viously received at Pacific. 

Charlotte Jones, V. of Idaho, hopes 
to return next year to graduate. 

Howard Nottage, U. of Oregon, 
wishes it were not too late to change 
from there back to a smaller col- 
lege. 

H. Brooks Terrell, Earlham, says, 
"maybe it's all right but I sure wish 
I were back at Pacific at times." 

Wilfred Crozer, Los Angeles, "You 
may not believe it but I'd sure give 
my right hand almost of I could be 
In P. C. instead of down here in 
this desert. * * * I wouldn't trade 
the college canyon for any 300 acres 
of scenery that I've yet seen in 
California." 



Friday, the 14, Professor Lewis 
spoke of "Books" in chapel. The 
practice of marking library books 
! was harshly dealt with, and under 
I threat of dire punishment, book- 
i worms at P. C. in the future should 
approach the library with much fear 
and trembling. It's a bad practice 
and was justly revealed. 



LECTURE HOLDS SUR- 
PRISE FORAUDIENCE 

Lecture by Ada Ward Far From 
Being Trite 



Ada Ward. English woman humor- 
ist and lecturer, presented at the 
third lyceum number at Pacific Col- 
lege, December 3, an unique and 
novel subject in her "You Amer- 
icans." Miss Ward's lecture was 
from quite the unusual viewpoint 
heard in English lectures. She con- 
gratulated us upon our many ad- 
vantages, and only criticized us for 
not seeming to appreciate them 
more. 

Among the things especially dwelt 
upon were the 3,000 miles of un- 
armed frontier, and the fact that 
English is spoken over so wide an 
area, while the splendid American 
homes, received special mention. 
"You build beautiful homes," said 
Miss Ward, "and then buy an auto- 
mobile and leave them just as quick- 
ly as possible." 

Commenting on child treatment in 
America, Miss Ward said, "Nowhere 
in the world are children given the 
latitude they are in America, and 
nowhere in the world are parents 
so obedient as they are in America." 

We have, according to this lecture, 
an abundance of luxuries that no 
other people know. In London, said 
Miss Ward, whole streets are light- 
ed with gas, and most of the homes. 
Telephones are seldom found in Eng. 
lish residences. "I never saw an 
ice box nor a refrigerator until I 
came to America," Miss Ward con- 
fessed, and then asked, "Are you 
thankful for your homes, your elec- 
tricity, your gas, your ice, your 
telephones, and other advantages?" 

A plea for peace thru the influence 
and leadership of the American and 
English peoples, concluded the lec- 
ture, and left doubtless an apprecia- 
tive and more thoughtful audience. 



TREFIAN 

A very interesting and instructive 
meeting of Trefian was held in the 
Dormitory Parlors, December 5th. 
After a short business session the 
roll was called to which the mem- 
bers answered with the name of their 
favorite painter and told the type 
of picture he painted. "Autumn" 
by Chaminade which was enjoyed 
very much was played by Helen 
Robertson. Gladys Crum gave a 
biography of Landseer and Elsie 
Allen told of his work and explain- 
ed some of his famous paintings. 
After the critics report the meeting 
adjourned. 



SCEDULE OF BASKET- 
BALL GAMES 



The following schedule gives dates 
and places for the games of the 
season : 

Jan. 12 — Linfield at Pacific. 
Jan. 19 — Normal at Pacific. 
Jan. 25 — Albany at Albany. 
Feb. 1 — Normal at Monmouth. 
Feb. 9 — North Pacific at Portland. 
Feb. 15 — Linfield at McMinnville. 
Feb. 22 — North Pacific at Pacific. 
Feb. 29 — Albany at Pacific. 



»Tp |_i »-j pn/ip XTTP tions about the campus. Help your- 

1 UU vKC3vCl> 1 self, while helping others. 



Entered as second-class mail matter 
at Postoffice at Newberg, Ore. 

Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 

Ben Darling Editor-in-Chief 

Iris Hewitt Associate Editor 

Florence Lee Society Editor 

John Chenevert Sports Editor 

Ralph Hester Business Manager 

Ivor Jones Circulation Manager 

REPORTERS 

Helen Hester, Marie Hester, Hulda 
Wlnslow, Rose Ellen Hale, Phillip 
Haworth, Edna Christie, Elsie Allen, 
Royal Gettman, Edith Sanderman and 
Lucille Clough. 

Terms: $1.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 

EXPRESSING CHRISTMAS SPIRIT 

Christmas is coming and Saint 
Nicholas, in the minds of children 
everywhere, is preparing for his long 
dash over the frozen snow, to bring 
to each child the desire of his heart 
in toys and dainties. 

No less in the minds of the grown- 
ups, is he preparing for his long, 
cold, but joyful ride, over frozen 
snows to place in each small stock- 
ing the toy that shall make a little 
heart rejoice. 

There are those who would give 
the lie to Santy Claus and celebrate 
Christmas as the birth of Christ only, 
forgetting that the date is largely 
a matter of convenience. Right or 
wrong, the happiest moments of a 
person's life are those when the 
Imagination, unbridled, flits away 
in youthful ecstacy into the land of 
make-believe. That is why children 
enjoy the Santa myth, and that is 
why grown-ups enjoy imagining 
themselves as Santa Claus. And 
that is why Christmas marks the 
high peak of happiness throughout 
the year, because it represents the 
joy and spirit of the Christ. 



THE GIVE AND TARE COLUMN 

In view of the fact that the con- 
siderable and recent discussion over 
etiquette seems to have originated 
among the female minds of the in- 
stitution, it might be well to present 
the matter at an angle, from whieh 
the women have not yet glanced 
at it. 

As far as the matter of etiquette 
is concerned, it seems that some of 
our dear sisters have overlooked the 
fact that things have changed dur- 
ing the past two or three genera- 
tions. They must remember that the 
minuet and crinoline and old lace 
and shilly-shally sentiment have been 
passed up in favor of the fox-trot, 
women's rights, free verse (and may- 
hap common sense.) 

The women are not to presume 
that the men are objecting an "over" 
observance of etiquette on the camp, 
us today. They are puzzled, how- 
ever, over the bruised feelings of 
some of the exceptionally fine-grain- 
ed women over "the horrible crude- 
ness of the men." Have our model 
women ever stopped to consider that 
they might realize some of their de- 
sires by lessening their superficial 
discussion of the matter and by be- 
ginning to recognize the men on the 
streets and on the campus? They 
need not fear that a fellow is going 
to take up a serious pursuit over 
having received a recognition from 
a girl in the form of a "hello" or 
"good morning." 

The relations between sexes here 
is obviously ridiculous and childish, 
but the fact that some of the girls 
will make acid remarks over "So-and- 

So" having been escorted by " 

and that others will "flop" a fellow 
and then boast of it, does not help 
matters any. 

The men are agreed that the 
women are their equals in the activ- 
ities of school and are attempting 
to treat them on that basis and if 
any of the latter wish to see things 
bettered, let them begin by meet- 
ing the men half way. 



THE TRUE COURTESY 

For sometime there has been an 
antagonastic social spirit between the 
hoys and girls of the institution. I 
Whatever the cause it should be 
remedied, as such an attitude is 
simply ridiculous. In a small co- j 
educational college, life among the ' 
students is similar in many respects , 
to a large family, and students ought ; 
to use the natural and common cour- 
tesy indulged by brothers and sis- , 
ters, to some extent at least. There , 
Is no real excuse for one student 
not speaking to another student 
when meeting, regardless of sex. The 
matter of etiquette of which much 
has been said and implied of late, 
is pretty much an invention for pro- , 
fessional society; and may become 
strained to the point of hypocrisy 
and unnaturalness. True courtesy, | 
as Mr. McCracken said in his chapel 
talk ,is largely a spiritual attitude. . 
Be natural with respect for the . 
rights of othprs and let the rest take 
care of itself. 



HERE'S YOUR CHANCE 

With this issue of the Crescent 
we onen to students and faculty an 
opportunity to express thoughts and 
knowledge pertaining to the sub- 
jects of these respective columns. 
One. the "Books Worth While" col- 
umn is for those who wish to pre- 
sent reviews of any new book com- 
ing into the library. The other, a 
"Give and Take" column is for those 
who wish to express thoughts thati 
may help clarify and adjust condi- 



BOOKS WORTH WHILE 

"The Rising Temper of the East." 
by Frazier Hunt is a sympathetic 
picture of those down-trodden coun- 
tries which have been exploited 
■while they are spoken of as "the 
white man's burden." Hunt has 
written an intensely interesting vol. 
urae in a very readable, high-class, 
journalistic style. It's subject mat- 
ter is based wholly on personal ex- 
perience and investigation. The 
writer has sought to portray the 
"soul" of the people In each country. 
What is this soul? is a fair enough 
question. It means for Frazier Hunt 
the feeling of group-consciousness 
among the masses. In vivid words, 
this journalist describes the birth 
throes of the struggle for fredom — 
and land in India. Egypt, China, 
Japan, Australia, then he turns to 
those territories in which America 
should be personally interested, the 
Philllppines, Mexico, and Haiti. No 
less interesting are the articles on 
Korea and Siberia. Personal in- 
terviews with such little known men 
as "Saint Gandhi," Pancho Villa 
who is pictured really Interested in 
his country's welfare, Kagawa, the 
labor leader of Japan, and others 
make the volume of vital Interest 
and importance. The book is dis- 
tinctly valuable for its unique point 
of view and also because it is read- 
able for the layman — so readable 
that even a causual reader will not 
lay It down unfinished. And quietly 
tucked away, is the tacit sermon that 
men are brothers in their desire for 
freedom. — L. C. 



The Crescent wishes all its read- 
ers a very Merry Christmas and a 
Happy New Year. 



WE SUGGEST 

That the girls repeat their victory 
over Linfleld next week. 

That Albert Windell get married 
and stop worrying about going bald. 
That the coach put new nets about 
the hoops before the basketball sea- 
son opens. | 

That Homer Hester get his signals 
to the referee sooner. 

i 

That a new bunch of yells would , 
stimulate rooting. 

That some of the girls practice 
what they preach. 

That Santa Claus give every one 
a nice present for Christmas. 



FORDS 

WE SELL 'EM 

WE FILL 'EM 

WE FIX 'EM 

NEWBERG MOTOR CO. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



Cecil F. Hinshaw received second 
honors in oratory at Friends Univer- 
sity which is considered very good 
because of the number jof strong 
orators entered in the contest. He 
himself felt that he did much better 
this time than he did two years 
ago as Pacific representative in the 
Oregon State contest. These honors 
were won beside the extra work he 
has been doing as one of Friends' 
debaters. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



THE FAIR STORE 

CHRISTMAS GOODS 

now on display 

Come in and look around 
Wallace & Son 



A FORD 

Is just the thing for 

That Family Xmas Gift 
AT YOUR SERVICE 
NEWBERG MOTOR COMPANY 



The Famous 

NEWBERG CANDY SHOP 

Will have everything in the line 

°f Home Made Candies 

Fancy Boxes and Cigars for 
Christmas Gifts. 



NEWBERG CYCLE COMPANY 

Earl Hutchinson, Prop. 
The sporting goods store 
Motorcycles, Bicycles, Supplies 
and Repairing 



WELLS 

FOR 

WESTINGHOUSE BATTERIES 



Black 122 Office White 22 

DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



NEWBERG TRANSFER CO. 

Local and Long Distance 
HAULING 

PHONE WHITE 187 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 
714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 
THE REXALL STORE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 

PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



GEO. WARD'S BARBER SHOP 

Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHILL ELECTRIC 



FRANK B. LAYMAN 
Attorney-at-Law 
First National Bank Building 



STUDENTS — 

For the easiest shave 
and most up-to-date 
hair cut, go to 

JAMES McCUIRE 

OPPOSITE (THE POST OFFICE 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY, Prop. 

Ice Cream and Candies 

Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies. 

Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



HOME CASH GROCERY 
Quality and Service 
312 FIRST STREET 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 



Anderson Motor 
Company 

STAR AND 
STUD E BAKER 

Sales and Service 

Associated Oil Products 
GENUINE FORD PARTS 



ACADEMY IEEE 

Silently, one by one, in the infinite 
class-books of the teachers. 
Blossom the little zeros, the forget- 
me-nots of the seniors. 

The dignified fourth years give 
this piece of fatherly advice to the 
first years: "Children should be seen 
and not heard." 

Miss Lee (in geometry) — "Thelma, 
quote the proposition for today." 
Thelma innocently quotes — "Two 
right triangles are equal when the 
hippopotamus of one is equal to the 
hippopotamus of the other." 

Gales of laughter follow this 
astounding discovery. 

When we were informed that there 
were no failures in American history 
class this month we concluded that 
when you become a fourth year you 
have learned how to do the least 
amount of work in the least amount 
of time without flunking. 

Prom the looks of "Doc" Crozer's 
arm we should judge that he has 
had actual experience with the force 
of gravity. 

If, while walking outside the col- 
lege building, you feel a rock or 
brick or other heavy substance hit 
you on the head, it is only the 
physics class experimenting with 
falling bodies. 

Teacher (in English IV) — "George 
put away your playthings and pay 
attention. Will you remember this 
tomorrow?" 

George — "Sure. What was it you 
said?" 

Miss Lee blithely informed the 
algebra III class the other day that 
she had visited the Houseboat on 
'the Styx in Hades. 

In recent academy student body 
meetings we have heard much con- 
cerning budget systems. Can any- 
one tell us what they are? 

The fourth years are in ecstacy 
over the belated arrival of their class 
rings but reflection on the expendi- 
ture invplved in getting them here 
somewhat dims the joy. 

There is rumor in the air that 
'Club El Regodeo is getting active 
again. Bulletins containing dark, 
mysterious Spanish words have blos- 
somed forth calling meetings of the 
club, and arousing the curiosity of 
the unitiated. 

The academy faculty was minus 
the services of Mrs. Michener for 
one day due to the fact that cold 
germs are contageous. 

We observe that Phil Gatch Is 
getting to be a tennis fiend. 

Miss Lee spent a day in Portland 
recently and put in her order with 
Santa Claus. We are hoping that 
one of the items was lollypops. 

George Poott and Phil Gatch are 
becoming expert dish washers. They 
are probably preparing for the 
future. 

Giwen Hanson's bright and smil- 
ing face was absent for a week. 

Bill Sweet is the new vice presi- 
dent of Club El Regodeo. 



CAN YOU IMAGINE: 

"Bevo" Lienard ever growing up? 

Landon McCracken ever having 
his algebra ni lesson? 

Ivor Jones with a halo? 

Ben Huntington never being a 
ladies man? 

George Poott ever studying his 
history lesson? 

Mildred Choate ever flunking? 

Wilbur Elliott having his math 
assignment on time? 

Thelma Rankin talking about the 
hippopotumas of a right triangle? 

Wesley Hollingsworth doing any- 
thing benefical? 

Miss Lee visiting the Houseboat 
on the Styx? 

The Algebra classes getting treat- 
ed to all-day suckers? 



CHAPEL GLEANINGS 

Tuesday, December 10, Dr. Lee 
of the Presbyterian church, had 
charge of the chapel services. Tak- 
ing his thoughts from Acts 3, Dr. 
Lee made it quite clear that there 
are values in life not of material 
things. He showed how infinitely 
more valuable was the service ren- 
dered the lame man in life and 
strength and a clean body; than 
gold or silver could have been things 
to attain. The students appreciate 
Dr. Lee's chapel talks, as they are 
always illuminating. 



Stacy J. McCracken, financial sec- 
retary to Pacific College, gave a 
splendid chapel talk on Thursday, 
December 13. Mr. McCracken pro- 
duced plenty of laughter with his 
timely stories, but made his mes- 
sage the more effective because of 
them. The clean body and clear 
brain was the theme of his talk. 
Mr. McCracken ended hy quoting the 
following, "Golden Rule of Three." 



Three things to be — Pure, just and 
honest. 

Three things to govern — temper, 
tongue and conduct. 

Three things to live — courage, af- 
fection and gentleness. 

Three things to love — the wise, 
the virtuous and the innocent. 

Three things to command — thrift, 
industry and promptness. 

Three things about which to think 
— life, death and eternity. 

Three things to despise — cruetly, 
arrogance and ingratitude. 

Three things to admire — dignity, 
gracefulness and intellectual power. 

Three things to cherish — the true, 
the beautiful and the good. i 

Three things for which to wish — ' 
health, friends and contentment. , 

Three things for which to fight 
honor, home and country. 

Three things to attain — goodness : 
of heart, integrity of purpose and 
cheerfulness of disposition. 

Three things to give — alms to thej 
needy, comfort to the sad and ap-' 
preciation to the worthy. 

Three things to desire — the bless- 
ing of God, an approving conscience' 
and the fellowship of the good. 

Three things for which to work — j 
a trained mind, a skilled hand and 
a regulated heart. 

Three things for which to hope — 
a haven of peace, a robe of right-; 
eousness and the crown of life. 

Beattie. 



PERSONALS 

Mary Elliott play_ed_at keeping 
house for a time recently while her 
mother made a trip to Seattle with 
Mr. and Mrs. Ross Miles and Mr. 
and Mrs. M. G. Elliott. 

It's a trite saying that all that 
goes up must come down, but never- 
theless it applies to auto tires. Ask — 
well try Virgil Hinshaw. Don't be 
discouraged if he doesn't respond, 
try Albert Reed. In case of con- 
tinued silence report in the next 
issue. 

There was a good sized group of 
rooters down from Linfield to see 
the recent volley ball game. Such 
occasions give us splendid opportun- 
ities to widen our acquaintences. 

Fellows have you taken out your 
life insurance? Remember when 
you come back to school it will be 
leap year. An accident policy is 
recommended for the girls. 

Anna Mills P. C. '22 was a visitor 
in the college community at Thanks- 
giving time. 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



You Get Your Money's Worth 

— at the — 

GEM BARBER SHOP 



ELLIOTT TIRE SHOP 

for 

TIRES AND TUBES 

Vulcanizing and Repairing 

Umbrellas Repaired 



HEAR YE! HEAR YE! 

The annual home-coming party of 
former and present students of 
Pacific College will be held la: 
Wood-Mar Hall, Saturday evening,' 
Dec. 29, at 8:00 o'clock. Everyone 
who has ever attended P. C. as a- 
college, academy or commercial stu-i 
dent, past or present, is cordially 
invited to be present. : j 



JOKES 

First Nut — "I see by the paper' 
where they found Columbus' bones."; 

Second Nut — "Huh, I never knewj 
he was a gambling man." 



M. E. squeezing B. H. who squeal- 
ed horribly. B. H. squeezing M. E. 
who does not squeal. M. E. "Huh! 
that's nothing, I'm used to that!" 
We wonder who? 



Girls — "Have you read or seen the 
latest best seller. We have it on 
our shelves. Complexions." 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 
Deliver before and after school 
Phone Red 86 
MOORE & SON 



W. W. HOLLINGSWORTH CO. 

STORE OP QUALITY 



500 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



Yours for Service and Quality 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



C. A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 

.1 Ms: Si 



DR. THOS. W. HESTER 

Physician and Surgeon 

Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG, -:- OREGON 



FOR SALE — Overland automobile. 
Guaranteed to withstand the night 
air. Virgil V. Hinshaw. 



Patronize Crescent Advertisers. 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



KTENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



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NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 

Best of Bread; Finest Cakes. 
Pies like Mother used to make. 



All Kinds of 
GROCERIES AND CANDY 

— at — 

J. L. VAN BLARICOM'S 
Let us quote you prices 



BOB WALKER 
Shoe Shine Parlor 

Ladies' Suede Shoes a Speciality 

CANDIES AND GUM 
STAGE DEPOT 



A Word 



to the wise is sufficient 
Compare Quality as well as Price 
What vou eat and wear get 



— AT— 



Miller Mercantile Co. 



"Good Goods" 



Newberg 
Restaurant 

The only one that has 



Good 
Waffles 



ROBERT CROUSE, Prop. 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171 
Office over U. S. National Bank 



£. C. B AIRS 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 

We Appreciate Your Patronage 
Phone Red 37 



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DR. A. M. DAVIS DR. I. R. ROOT 

DENTISTS 

Over Ferguson's Drag Store 
Phone White 38 



20TH CENTURY COFFEE 

Roasted Today 
On your table tomorrow 

20TH CENTURY GROCERY 

702 First St. 



PEOPLE'S MARKET 
We Deliver 

PHONE BLUE 220 



A. a "SMITH 

Dealer in Leather Goods 
Auto Tops a Speciality 

703 First Street 



r 








EVANS 






PHOTOGRAPHER 






KODAK FINISHING 








> 



Will B. Brooks 
Printer 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



HOFFMAN STEAM PRESS 
Cleaning Pressing Repairing 

RYGG THE TAILOR 

PHONE BLACK 180 



THE REALM OF FICTION 

A curious stillness yet an ever 
Increasing, ever changing buzz was 
in the air. Faculty heads were bent 
together in ill-concealed consterna- 
tion. President Pennington dashed 
thru the hall, rushed to the phone, 
and thundered a number at the ill- 
fated central. Getting no reply, he 
slammed up the receiver, swung 
swiftly around just in time to col- 
lide with Mr. Cramlet. Successfully 
extracting himself from this tangle 
he hurried into the hall where Miss 
Clarke and Miss Lee stood frantically 
gesticulating and talking. Prof. Per- 
isho, with an inscrutable conten- 
ance, stepper! up to the group. "Have 
you found any trace of Prof. New- 
lin?" they cried in chorus. 

Students standing near wondered 
at the excitement exhibited by the 
faculty, and catching the excited 
question of the group, became im- 
measurably curious. These students 
retired to the register to compare 
notes. Prof. Newlin had been absent 
from his history class that morn- 
ing; and now the faculty excitedly 
wanting to know if he had been 
traced! 

At this moment Prof, and Miss 
Lewis emerged from room 15 in 
deep and serious controversy. Digni- 
fied, quiet Prof. Weesner ran up the 
steps two at a time, tripped on a 
tack, regalnd his balance and caught 
up with Prof, and Miss Lewis. In 
a breathless whisper he spoke to 
them. "Eloped!" cried Miss Lewis. 

Imagine the panic over the reg- 
ister! Prof. Newlin gone! Some- 
body eloped! Could it be — yes it 
must be — no it couldn't be. Had 
Prof. Newlin ? 

Students, all ears, hovered over 
the register. This certainly was the 
rarest bit of gossip ever entered at 
P. C. What would happen. 

Just then the south door flew open 
and Prof. Newlin rushed up the 
<tairs, handed Pres. Pennington a 
bunch of keys and exclaimed, "Have 
you heard the latest? King Tut has 
eloped with the Pope's widow!" 



EVANS 
PLUMBING COMPANY 

311 First Street 



"And the shepherds were keeping 
watch over their flocks by night." 
I 

One night, so many years ago. 
Outside the walls of Beth'lem 
town, 

Some shepherds watched the skies 
aglow. 

The full moon shed her radiance 
down, 

A strange new star gleamed bright 
o'er head. 
Its splendor fairly filled the sky. 
The shepherds, in their lowly beds. 
Watched the star, and wondered 
why. 

H 

Lo! as they watched the star grew 
brighter, 

And the shepherds cowed in fear; 
The radiant sky grew light and 
lighter, 

The great star seemed to come 
more near. 
When suddenly the heavens opened. 

And a great and holy light 
Shone upon the fearful shepherds; 
Shone and brightened all the night. 
Ill 

Then a voice came out of heaven 
Saying soft in accents sweet, 

"God has sent his son from heaven; 
He in a manger lies asleep." 

The shepherds heard the angels 
clearly, 

Singing now. In voices low, 
"God has loved his son so dearly, 
He sent Him down to earth below." 

Marjorie Elliott. 



ECONOMY CLEANERS 
AND DYERS 

ELGIN VAN BLARICOM 



ERRATA 

The last Crescent contained the 
following error under "Who's Who 
at Pacific:" "Academy Officers," 
should have been "Trefian Officers." 



Watches Jewelry Clocks 
E. G. REID 
Watch and Clock Repairing 
All Work Guaranteed 
906 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



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W. H. BEST 

W. W. HOWETT 

PLUMBING AND HEATING 

WATER METERS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



DR. S. M. WENST 
Snrgeon 

Eye, Ear, Nose and Throat 
Calls answered to your home 
EDWARDS BLDG. NEWBERG 




Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 



OVER U. S. BANK 



X-Ray Diagnosis 
GAS ADMINISTERED 



Pacific Students: 

SUPPLIES AND SERVICE AT 

Parker Hardware Co. 



UNITED-STATES NATIONAL BANK 

Capital, Snrplns and Profits $125,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ESTBLISHED 1889 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



"Rosebud Flour" 

MONEY BACK IF NOT SATISFACTORY 



THE CHRISTMAS STORE 
Sensible Gifts 
LARKIN PRINCE HARDWARE COMPANY 

We list 250 Gift Ideas in the Graphic to help you choose. 



CAMPBELL'S 

School Supplies - Lunch - Soft Drmks 

CANDIES 

College Trade Always Appreciated 
NEWBERG, ORE.